Lords of Summer: Sweet Summer Sun

I’ve been pretty inconsistent posting on here so let’s see what I can generate. I’m going to attempt writing more random recollections on music, movies, and movements. I used to do it back when I was a lot more freewheelin’ and weirder. It also helped that I had a lot more free time on my hands. So let’s all get weird together again.

It’s arguably been my most eventful Summer yet, trekking to both places familiar and alien. An ocean? Holy shit. We’ll get to that…

The opening scene of Summer happened in late May in Chicago with Woodstock ’15 (Fagan term). First on the docket was a return to Wrigley Field to see the Cubs vs. Royals. This was my first time back in the friendly confines to see a Cub game since 2011 I believe (Checks facts, still hazy).

There hasn’t been a whole lot to cheer about over the past 4-5 seasons during this rebuilding stretch, but out of those ashes has risen a youthful, hungry 2015 Cub team. This has been the long-term plan ever since the new front office of President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein and General Manager Jed Hoyer joined the Cubs in late 2011. They’re ruthless and cut-throat when it comes to analytical decisions and they will do whatever it takes to make the Cubs succeed and chase down that elusive World Series title. After what they did in Boston, I fully trust them to get it done.

It was a great time being out in the center field bleachers for the first time. I had far too many beers (I would not recommend drinking a 12-pack worth of beers at Wrigley alone, for both your liver and your wallet) and the crowd was a rabid mix of Cubs fans and Royals fans (Est. 2014). Unfortunately I think I legitimately went to The General Jake Arrieta’s last “bad” start (This was May 29th, almost three months ago) as the Royals ended up pulling away with this one. I anticipated retribution the following night but it was not to be as the game was rained out. I’ll have to wait until the make up game on September 28th, which could have huge playoff implications for both teams. If I would’ve known then what I know now just how great this Cubs team would turn out to be, I wouldn’t have been as disappointed in the loss. The young nucleus of this team is only going to get better too as the years go on. More importantly they make sure to keep it fun.

Denorfia W

After having a few more (unneeded) beers at Merkle’s it was up to my associate Matt Moss and I to stumble drunkenly through the Wrigleyville area in an attempt to find the Riviera Theatre to see “The Chief” Noel Gallagher. astonishingly we were able to find it (After a vital pit stop at Al’s Italian Beef) and Noel was able to pick us up with his impeccable, soaring anthems. A set that infused magnificent solo cuts (If you don’t have the new incredible Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds album Chasing Yesterday that was released in March, stop reading this post, order it, then continue reading) with timeless Oasis classics ending things with a majestic “Don’t Look Back in Anger.”

June brought with it a pilgrimage to Waverly, IA to experience the carnival feel of Mumford & Sons’ traveling Gentlemen of the Road festival. An interesting endeavor considering the current boom of stationary festivals. It was a diverse line-up that featured some of my favorite stalwart bands like Dawes, Jeff The Brotherhood, and The Flaming Lips as well as unfamiliar ones that were a pleasant surprise like Rubblebucket and The Maccabees. The two-headed dragon of My Morning Jacket and Mumford & Sons were to no surprise the best parts of the weekend. Mumford & Sons have seemingly made an effortless transition to the bright lights, big crowds, and main stages of the world. They were a well-oiled machine in Waverly and always an extraordinary live act. My heart however, belonged to My Morning Jacket pertaining to the live acts. They were operating on a totally different plateau than everyone else there that weekend both spiritually and physically. I’ll never tire of seeing them live, sonic transcendence at its best.

I had to pick myself up off the floor for the next weekend in Kansas City to see some band called The Rolling Stones. One of the bands I’ve definitely been pining for to see live and cross off my concert bucket list. It is astonishing what they are doing at their age but they still sounded incredible and Mick Jagger cemented his legacy as the greatest front man of all time. He strutted and preened like he was in his 20’s belting out classic after classic. It was like witnessing the Dead Sea Scrolls of Rock & Roll. They were in the rattling genesis of Rock music, like witnessing the Big Bang of the universe. I don’t know how long they’ll tour (Mick said he has no plans of retirement and Keith is going to live forever), but I’m glad I had a chance to see them live in person. What this had me salivating for more than anything was a new record from them. 2005’s A Bigger Bang was their best album in my opinion since 1978’s Some Girls and recent singles like “One More Shot” and “Doom and Gloom” came off as effortless blues rock instant classics. I’m sure they have enough fire power to churn out another batch of marvelous tunes. I’d love for them to work with Jack White or Rick Rubin as the producer, but I’ll take anything to be honest.

Stones KC

I had been redlining at work for sometime and needed a lengthy break physically and mentally. I took the longest amount of time off I’ve had from work in 13 years, I whopping two weeks (For me that’s impressive!). For the first leg of vacation I headed to South Carolina, specifically Folly Beach for a relaxing few days. This was foreign territory for me, I’d never seen the Atlantic Ocean, it was a sight to behold. I am horrible at taking pictures so this was as good as it got (Look at that fuggin’ rad moon!).

Ocean Breathes Salty

We left South Carolina a few days later and proceeded to trek across the countryside for nearly 19 hours. What was awaiting me on the other side of this road trip was Chicago and Lollapalooza. I’ve now been to Lollapalooza six consecutive times and I must confess although it’s a great time, I was considering sitting out this year. The way the festival has been trending in recent years was more towards EDM (Bull shit), abysmal hip-hop (Bull shit), and flavorless pop acts (Bull shit) rather than the guitar-centered Rock & Roll bands. Sure there’s always a strong undercard every year but the main stages have been getting less stellar. Well, when they announced the Friday and Saturday headliners I was all in. Paul McCartney and Metallica, I thought it was a hoax at first. No hoax at all. I saw McCartney back at Bonnaroo in 2013 and he was the best act there and he was brilliant again here. Meanwhile it’s been nearly seven years since I’ve seen Metallica live and they did not let me down. They’re still arguably my favorite band of all time and have been since high school (Okay, okay, I had a severe Guns ‘N’ Roses crazed phase in there too). Couple those monolithic acts with the other acts I saw: St. Paul & The Broken Bones, Father John Misty, The War on Drugs, Gary Clark Jr., Catfish & The Bottlemen, Death From Above 1979, Delta Spirit, Tame Impala, Circa Waves, Lord Huron, Strand of Oaks, Of Monsters and Men, TV on the Radio, and Florence + The Machine and it was one of the best Lollapaloozas I’ve been to. Next year? We’ll see.

There’s a lot of details I left out but I’m getting royally distracted by the blitzkrieg heaviness of Metallica’s Lollapalooza set I purchased from their website:

Metallica.Lollapalooza.Chicago.cover_.0801-15I’ll always be forever tethered to this band. For people that don’t like Metallica or don’t understand, I’m not sure what to tell you. It’s that chaotic angst the registers in your marrow, only Metallica is able to drill that deep for me I think. You could buy the physical double CD of this show (Which I did) or download it. Metallica does this for all of their live shows now and I wish all acts would do it. For one, an extra source of revenue for them and two it would cut down on bootlegging.

That’s it for now, more posts coming I believe. One on Sunday if I’m up to the task.

P.S.- I’m seeing The Tallest Man on Earth tonight at the Englert Theatre in Iowa City so let the live shows keep flowing! I’ve seen him a few times already live and he’s extremely captivating, one of the best lyricists on the planet. Cheers!

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND- LIVE AT WRIGLEY FIELD 9/7/12

It’s been two weeks now since I saw Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band play at historic Wrigley Field in Chicago. I still cannot grasp the magnitude of this show. I didn’t think Bruce would ever be able to top his 3+ hour show from St. Paul, MN from May of 2009 as my favorite live show I’ve ever been to. Then he pulled out all of the stops on September 7th, 2012. Bruce and company hit Wrigley with searing falling meteor intensity and the force of a 10 megaton A-bomb. It was a relentless 3 and 1/2 hour marathon show. If The Boss with the E Street Band wasn’t enough they had a couple (cough) locals come out. Tom Morello and Eddie Vedder. Tom Morello and Eddie fuckin’ Vedder! My head was bout to explode! The most eclectic set I’ve seen from Springsteen that’s for sure. The memorable moments seemed endless beginning with “Prove It All Night” with the 1978 extended piano/guitar intro. Other rarities I loved included “My Love Will Not Let You Down”, and one of my all-time favorites “Spirit in the Night”. Morello played blistering maddening guitar on seven songs including his crowning moment the cosmic mind-bending solos from “The Ghost Of Tom Joad”. Bruce and Eddie performed a duet of “Atlantic City”. It’s a real treat to listen to Eddie’s voice live. He has a voice that could make you melt. The encore was brilliant loaded heavily with cuts from Born To Run. “Thunder Road”, “Born To Run” and a beautiful moving tribute to Clarence Clemons on “Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out”. The best moment however, was the one song I’ve wanted to see the most live, and I finally got it. Jungleland. JUNGLELAND. I could, and perhaps I should just leave it at that, it’s really tough to put into words what this song means to me. It’s the consummate Springsteen song, maybe my favorite Springsteen song. It’s everything that’s good about Rock & Roll, about music. It’s the greatest epic album closer of any album ever made in my opinion. It’s spiritual, and you feel like you’re achieving transcendence. As for that legendary Clarence Clemons sax solo? His nephew Jake Clemons nailed it just as he did with every other sax solo that night. I was impressed. Very few songs have moved me to tears, but they were certainly welling up in my eyes. Not out of misery or sadness, but pure ebullience, ecstasy. I could die a happy man after hearing that. Bruce and friends closed out the set with a rapturous cover of “Twist And Shout” just a shade under midnight. My throat was shot, I was sweating despite it being a windy cool night, and physical sore. In a nutshell I was exhausted and there was a man onstage nearly 63 years old besting me! Unbelievable! Humans shouldn’t have that type of endurance, let alone at 63! Bruce’s fans demand a great deal from him live night after night after night. And he always delivers. Conversely Bruce expects that same passion back from the audience. We’re doing everything we can Boss! Thanks Boss… again. Here’s the write-up courtesy of Backstreets.com:


September 7 / Wrigley Field / Chicago, IL

Notes: During tonight’s “roll call,” Bruce had a special introduction to make: “Born in Chicago in 1951, Mr. Nils Lofgren!” But Nils wasn’t the only native son in the house tonight — this first of two shows at Wrigley Field felt almost like Old Home Night, with major guest spots from Tom Morello (who grew up in the Chicago suburb of Libertyville) and Eddie Vedder (born and raised in Evanston). Both Springsteen pals are lifelong Cubs fans, clearly thrilled to be on stage in the Friendly Confines, and they each pitched in on several songs. As Bruce said, it was “a cavalcade — a cavalcade of stars!”

Morello threw down perfectly wrought solos for his Wrecking Ball staples “Death to My Hometown” and “Jack of All Trades.” He was back later for his trademark electric “The Ghost of Tom Joad” duet, trading vocals and guitar leads with Springsteen (truly shredding — and scratching — by the end), and he remained on stage as that energy kept flowing for an ecstatic “Badlands” and the set-closing “Land of Hope and Dreams.” Mid-set, Vedder strapped on a guitar for “Atlantic City,” sharing lead vocals on a stellar performance. Eddie and Tom both came back in the encores.

Spread throughout the set, a trove of mid-’80s rarities. The band broke out “My Love Will Not Let You Down” in the second slot — a real highlight, with that classic chiming guitar trio of Nils, Bruce, and Steve downstage, as well as a kick-ass drum breakdown from Max. There was also a muscular “Trapped,” one of those relative obscurities that still galvanizes a stadium crowd; “I’m Goin’ Down” (which led right into the more frequently spotted “Darlington County”); and a true rarity, played live by the E Street Band only twice before, “None But the Brave.” “I think this is a tour debut, I could be wrong,” Bruce said, and he was right. “This is for all the hardcore fans out there. This was written for Born in the U.S.A. Didn’t make it on there.” Sounding surprisingly well-rehearsed (it was soundchecked in Philadelphia, at least), “None But the Brave” was absolutely majestic, Eddie Manion bringing it home at the end, blowing for all he’s worth.

The concert began with the ’78-style intro to “Prove It All Night.” Coveted as it is by those aforementioned hardcore fans, and for good reason, it made a slightly strange opener — an extended instrumental to start the show — and there wasn’t clear recognition among the crowd until the song’s main piano riff kicked in. But plenty of power there regardless, big cheers for Jake, and Nils twirling away on a fierce solo at the end. Followed by “My Love,” it was a killer one-two punch.

The next two songs setlisted were “Adam Raised a Cain” and “Lost in the Flood,” and you can gather how Bruce’s mood must have changed between writing the setlist and playing the show, as he replaced them with audibles of “Out in the Street” and “Hungry Heart.” For the latter he ventured out into the crowd, saluting fans on the “Wrigley Rooftops” just outside the ballpark, even adding a nod to the Drifters’ “Up on the Roof” as the song went along. But despite that shift to stadium-friendly crowd-pleasers, which gave the show some ups and downs, there was really something for everybody tonight. Radio hits, deep cuts, special guests, strong Wrecking Ball performances (“Shackled and Drawn” was a particular showstopper, Cindy Mizelle just tearing it up), and, in the encore, a glittery sign request from a “14-year-old lady” granted for “Jungleland.” It’s the first “Jungleland” I’ve seen with Jake, and my emotions were all over the place — though what got me in my gut was not Jake’s solo (which was pretty damn faultless), but Bruce’s wordless vocals at the end, those howls into the night sky. No wonder he keeps talking about ghosts.

And then Tom Morello and Eddie Vedder were back on stage for the last two songs, Tom in his Cubs cap, both beaming as bright as Wrigley’s night baseball lights, sharing Steve’s mic on “Twist and Shout” as they sent us home dancing. What more do you want? A cool, breezy night, perfectly dry despite the predicted thunderstorms? Yeah, we got that too.
– Christopher Phillips reporting – photographs by C.P. (1,3) and Lois Bernstein (2, 4-8)

Setlist:
Prove It All Night (’78 intro)
My Love Will Not Let You Down
Out in the Street
Hungry Heart
We Take Care of Our Own
Wrecking Ball
Death to My Hometown (with Tom Morello)
My City of Ruins
Spirit in the Night
Trapped
Jack of All Trades (with Tom Morello)
Atlantic City (with Eddie Vedder)
Lonesome Day
I’m Goin’ Down
Darlington County
Shackled and Drawn
Waitin’ on a Sunny Day
None But the Brave
The Ghost of Tom Joad (with Tom Morello)
Badlands (with Tom Morello)
Land of Hope and Dreams (with Tom Morello)
* * *
We Are Alive
Thunder Road
Born to Run
Dancing in the Dark
Jungleland
Tenth Avenue Freeze-out (with Morello and Vedder)
Twist and Shout (with Morello and Vedder)